How do host-defence peptides influence microbiome dysbiosis?

Abstract

Host defence peptides (HDP) form an important part of the innate immune system of a wide variety of organisms. They are expected to play a crucial role in health by maintaining a balanced microbial community for the host, but the mechanism for this role and the reasons for its occasional failure are unknown. Here we will investigate how a particular HDP, elafin, responds to disruption of the vaginal microbial community. We will describe the vaginal dysbiosis, characterizing changes in key bacterial species, and provide a mechanism at the system and molecular levels of how elafin polices the bacterial community.




References:
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Biological Areas:

Structural Biology
Microbiology

BBSRC Area:

Molecules, cells and industrial biotechnology